Frocester

 

 

Site type: Doubtful

This site has been identified due to the presence of St Peter’s Church 1.5km to the west of the present settlement of Frocester. The church has been mainly destroyed, but areas have been excavated which show evidence of a Roman villa, followed by a Norman church constructed on the site. [1] The area surrounding the church shows no evidence of settlement remains, but ridge and furrow is present. There has been extensive excavation and fieldwork carried out in the parish enabling a detailed understanding of settlement development from the pre-Roman period onwards. [2]

Frocester was recorded in the Domesday Book with a minimum population of 18. A church is recorded in the 1291 Taxation. In 1327 12 people were assessed. [3] In the sixteenth century at least 40 households are recorded and in 1603 210 communicants are recorded. [4] Antiquarian reports suggested the village around the church had been burnt down and moved to a dryer location. [5] A sizeable settlement still exists and bears the name Frocester but this is to the east. It has been suggested that this has always been the location of the settlement. [6] The location of the church could be explained as being placed in between Frocester and Coaley, both of which it served. [6] It has also been shown that the parish of Frocester included a number of small dispersed settlements, many of which were abandoned in the thirteenth century. [7] There is no clear evidence of settlement in the area of St Peter’s Church and therefore the site has now been classified as doubtful. [2] However when the deserted settlements of Gloucestershire are reviewed in the future, a number of the small dispersed settlements that have been identified in the parish may then appear in the new gazetteer.

Appears in the Gazetteer of Deserted Medieval Villages known in 1968.

References:
[1] Gracie, H.S. 1963. ‘St Peter’s Church, Frocester’, Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 82: 148-167.
[2] Price, E. 1998. ‘Frocester: Landscape and Settlement from the 5th Century to Modern Times’, Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 116: 9-24.
[3] Franklin, P. 1993. The Taxpayers of Medieval Gloucestershire. Stroud: Alan Sutton: 117.
[4] Dyer, A. and D.M. Palliser 2005. The Diocesan Population Returns for 1563 and 1603. Oxford: Oxford University Press: 333.
[5] Atkyns, R. 1712. The Ancient and Present State of Gloucestershire. London: Robert Gosling: 446.
[6] Herbert, N.M. 1972. 'Frocester', in C.R. Elrington and N.M. Herbert (eds) A History of the County of Gloucester. Volume 10: 170-178. London: Oxford University Press.
[7] Aston, M. and L. Viner 1984. ‘The Study of Deserted Villages in Gloucestershire’, in A. Saville (ed.) Archaeology in Gloucestershire: 276-293. Cheltenham: Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museums and the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeology Society: 289-290.
Pre-1974 county:
Gloucestershire
Historic parish:
Frocester
Present county or unitary area:
Gloucestershire
Modern parish:
Frocester
Grid reference:
SO 770033
Latitude:
51.72794390
Longitude:
-2.33440473

Documentary resources
Domesday reference:
GLOS 10,2
Domesday minimum number of individuals:
18
Taxation 1291 (main):
1600
Taxation 1291 (portions):
1200 (Vicarage)
Lay subsidy 1334 total paid:
Not recorded
Poll Tax 1377 number who paid:
No surviving record
Poll Tax 1377 total paid:
No surviving record
Poll Tax 1379 number who paid:
No surviving record
Poll Tax 1379 total paid:
No surviving record
Poll Tax 1381 number who paid:
No surviving record
Poll Tax 1381 total paid:
No surviving record
Lay subsidy 1524 number who paid:
40
Lay Subsidy 1524 total paid:
192
Lay Subsidy 1525 number who paid:
Not recorded
Lay Subsidy 1525 total paid:
Not recorded
Lay Subsidy 1543/4 number who paid:
Diocesan returns 1563:
41
Census 1801 total population:
362 (Parish)
Census 1841 total population:
344 (Parish)
Census 1841 inhabited houses:
68
E179 date and type last doc:
1677 April 16 act to raise £584,978 2s 2½d to build 30 ships
Additional information
Alternative names:
Presumed date of depopulation:
NMR number:
113223
HER number:
GLOS 5208
Investigation history:
1958-1959 Excavations.
1972 Field Visit.
1973 Excavations.
1976-1977 Evaluation.
1998 Excavation.
Cartographic or photographic records:
RAF CPE/UK/2098 4355-6 Taken 28 May 1947.
Aston, M. and L. Viner 1984. ‘The Study of Deserted Villages in Gloucestershire’, in A. Saville (ed.) Archaeology in Gloucestershire: 276-293. Cheltenham: Cheltenham Art Gallery and Museums and Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society. Plan p. 290.
Site status:
Not Scheduled
x coordinate:
377000
y coordinate:
203300
Bibliography:
Aston, M. and L. Viner 1981. ‘Gloucestershire Deserted Villages’, Glevensis 15: 22-29.
Beresford, M. and J.G. Hurst (eds) 1971. Deserted Medieval Villages. London: Lutterworth.
Price, E. 1998. ‘Frocester: Landscape and Settlement from the 5th Century to Modern Times’, Transactions of the Bristol and Gloucestershire Archaeological Society 116: 9-24.
Price, E. 2000. Frocester: a Romano-British settlement, its antecedents and successors. Volume 1: the sites. Stonehouse: Gloucester and District Archaeological Research Group.
Price, E. 2000. Frocester: a Romano-British settlement, its antecedents and successors. Volume 2: the Finds. Stonehouse: Gloucester and District Archaeological Research Group.
Price, E. 2008. Frocester: a Romano-British settlement, its antecedents and successors. Volume 4: The Village. Stonehouse: Gloucester and District Archaeological Research Group.
Price, E. 2010. Frocester: a Romano-British settlement, its antecedents and successors. Volume 3: Excavations 1995-2009. Stonehouse: Gloucester and District Archaeological Research Group.
See also:
NMR Pastscape
www.pastscape.org.uk/hob.aspx?hob_id=113223
Open Domesday
opendomesday.org/place/SO7803/frocester/
Gloucestershire Archaeology
www.glosarch.org.uk/frocesteroverview.html